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Social Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers

What they do?

The following is a summary of main duties for some occupations in this unit group:

A. Social policy researchers develop social programs, social legislation, or proposals based on demographic, social and economic analysis and the evaluation of pilot projects.

B. Home economists conduct research, advise consumers on the selection and proper use of food products, textiles and other consumer goods and teach household management skills. They may also provide consultative services in the areas of development and promotion of new food products, retail buying, social program administration and small business endeavours.

C. Housing policy analysts identify and assess economic, demographic, and social developments and report on their implications for housing policy.

D. International aid and development project officers plan, organize and administer foreign aid and international development policies and programs.

E. Social survey researchers develop questionnaires, co-ordinate and conduct surveys, analyse data, and compile and interpret statistics on social issues and policy areas.

F. Social services planners conduct research, develop social programs, assess, coordinate and develop awareness of existing social services, and ensure that duplication of services is avoided. They may also work with land use planners to determine the impact of major land use plans for transportation, housing and recreational facilities projects.

Where they find work?

1. Public administration - 52.0%
2. Health care and social assistance - 13.0%
3. Other services (except public administration) - 10.0%
4. Management scientific and technical consulting services - 5.0%

What education do I need?

1. A bachelor's degree or college diploma in a social science or related discipline, or in business administration is usually required.

2. A master's degree in a social science or related discipline or in business administration may be required.

3. Home economists require a bachelor's degree in home economics, home economics education, human ecology, nutrition and food sciences or family and consumer studies.

4. Registration is available, but voluntary, for the designation "Registered Home Economist" in New Brunswick, Ontario, Manitoba and Alberta, and "Registered Professional Home Economist" in British Columbia.

5. Most recent entrants have a graduate degree, and almost 2 in 5 have a undergraduate unversity degree .

High School Subject that will help:

1. Math
2. English
3. Social Studies
4. Computer-related courses

What can you expect to make:

The average hourly wages for Social Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers is $25.92/HR, which is close to the average for occupations in the social science, education, government service and religion and are close to the average for all professional occupations. These wages grew at an average rate from 2002 to 2004.

Average Wage

Social Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers wages

Expected Wage by Age

Social Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers Wage By Age

Unemployment:

3% of Social Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers are unemployed. This rate is close to the average for professional occupations.

Unemployment

Social Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers Unemployment

Current Job Outlook:

The job outlook for Social Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers is considered Average because:

1. Employment grew at an average rate.

2. The retirement rate is above average, and the number of retiring workers contributes to job openings.

3. Hourly wages ($25.92) are above the average ($18.07), and the rate of wage growth is close to the average.

4. The unemployment rate (3%) is close to the 2004 average (7%).

Future Job Prospects:

Your job outlook will continue to be Average because:

1. The employment growth rate will likely be close to the average.

2. The retirement rate will likely be above average and the number of retiring workers should contribute to job openings.

3. The number of job seekers will likely exceed the number of job openings.

Highest Concetration:

The highest concentrations Social Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers are found in Alberta and Nova Scotia while the lowest concentrations are in Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland.

Unionization Rate:

The unionization rate (55%) is close to the average (32%) for all occupations.

Useful Experience:

1. Leadership

2. Researching

3. Project management

Part Time Workers

Social Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers Part Time Workers

Part time workers:


11% of Social Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers are employed only on a part-time basis. There were 17,100 workers employed in these occupations in 2004, an increase of 56% since 1997.

Age Demographics

Social Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers Age Demographics

Age Demographics:


The relatively low percentage of younger workers suggests few entry-level job openings, and could point to a greater need for workers with experience or a number of years of training. The retirement rate to 2009 will likely be above average reflecting the age/retirement structure of the occupation.

Self Employed

Social Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers Self Employed

Self Employed:


Roughly 5% of Social Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers are self-employed. This is considered Above average for the industry as a whole.

Men vs Women

Social Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers Men vs Women

Men vs Women:


73% of the individuals employed as Social Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers are women. Compared to other industries, this is Above average.