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Stationary Engineers and Power Station and System Operators

What they do?

Stationary engineers and auxiliary equipment operators maintain and operate stationary engines/auxiliary equipment such as boilers, turbines, generators, compressors, pumps, pollution control devices, and other equipment to provide heat, ventilation, refrigeration, light, and power for buildings/industrial plants.

Power system operators monitor and operate computerized switchboards/auxiliary equipment in electrical control centres to control/regulate electrical power in transmission networks.

Power station operators run reactors, turbines, boilers, generators, condensers, and auxiliary equipment in hydro, thermal, and nuclear power plants to generate electric power.

Where they find work?

1. Mining - unspecified - 30.0%
2. Paper manufacturing - 10.0%
3. Health care and social assistance - 6.0%
4. Food manufacturing - 5.0%
5. Public administration - 4.0%
6. Primary metal manufacturing - 3.0%
7. Wood product manufacturing - 3.0%

What education do I need?

1. In general, you need a high school diploma and specialized training.

2. To be a stationary engineer or auxiliary equipment operator, you need an apprenticeship program in stationary or power engineering; or on-the-job training and correspondence/high school courses; or a college training program in stationary or power engineering. You also need certification in the province/territory where you'll work.

3. To be a power system operator, you need to finish a three- to five-year apprenticeship or have more than three years' experience and some college or industry courses in electrical/electronic technology.

4. To be a power station operator, you must complete an apprenticeship in stationary or power engineering, or have several years' experience and some high school, correspondence or college courses in stationary or power engineering. You also need certification in the province/territory where you'll work.

5. To be a control room operator at a nuclear power plant, you need a licence from the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission.

6. Almost 2 in 5 have a community college diploma.

High School Subject that will help:

1. Math
2. Computer Basics - Word and Excel
3. Physics
4. Industrial Arts (Electricity)

What can you expect to make:

The average hourly wages for Stationary Engineers and Power Station and System Operators is $24.58/HR, which is above average for occupations in the trades, transport and equipment operators sector and above average for all technical, professional, and skilled occupations. These wages grew at an above-average rate from 2002 to 2004.

Average Wage

Stationary Engineers and Power Station and System Operators wages

Expected Wage by Age

Stationary Engineers and Power Station and System Operators Wage By Age

Unemployment:

4% of Stationary Engineers and Power Station and System Operators are unemployed. This rate is close to the average for technical, professional, and skilled occupations.

Unemployment

Stationary Engineers and Power Station and System Operators Unemployment

Trends in Unemployment

Stationary Engineers and Power Station and System Operators Trends in Unemployment

Current Job Outlook:

The job outlook for Stationary Engineers and Power Station and System Operators is considered Average because:

1. Employment grew at an average rate.

2. The retirement rate is above average, and the number of retiring workers contributes to job openings.

3. Hourly wages ($24.58) are above the average ($18.07), and the rate of wage growth is also above average.

4. The unemployment rate (4%) is close to the 2004 average (7%).

Future Job Prospects:

Your job outlook will continue to be Average because:

1. The employment growth rate will likely be below average because new technologies should continue to improve productivity, allowing employers to do more with fewer workers.

2. The retirement rate will likely be above average and the number of retiring workers should contribute to job openings.

3. The number of job openings will likely exceed the number of job seekers. This will not be significant enough to have an impact on the work prospects.

Highest Concetration:

The highest concentrations (per 10,000 people) of are found in Alberta and Prince Edward Island while the lowest concentrations are in New Brunswick and Newfoundland.

Unionization Rate:

The unionization rate (81%) is above the average (32%) for all occupations.

Useful Experience:

1. Monitoring

2. Computerized equipment

3. Mechanics

Part Time Workers

Stationary Engineers and Power Station and System Operators Part Time Workers

Part time workers:


2% of Stationary Engineers and Power Station and System Operators are employed only on a part-time basis. There were 25,300 workers employed in these occupations in 2004, a decrease of 28% since 1997.

Age Demographics

Stationary Engineers and Power Station and System Operators Age Demographics

Age Demographics:


The relatively low percentage of younger workers suggests few entry-level job openings, and could point to a greater need for workers with experience or a number of years of training. The earlier-than-average retirement age (60) combined with an expected older-than-average age (44) of worker will likely result in an above-average retirement rate to 2009.

Self Employed

Stationary Engineers and Power Station and System Operators Self Employed

Self Employed:


Roughly 1% of Stationary Engineers and Power Station and System Operators are self-employed. This is considered Below average for the industry as a whole.

Men vs Women

Stationary Engineers and Power Station and System Operators Men vs Women

Men vs Women:


1% of the individuals employed as Stationary Engineers and Power Station and System Operators are women. Compared to other industries, this is Below average.