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Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators

What they do?

School bus drivers perform some or all of the following duties:

A. Drive school buses to transport children between school and home or on excursions

B. Ensure children's safety when boarding and leaving buses and crossing street while bus is stopped.

Subway train and light rail transit operators perform some or all of the following duties:

A. Operate subway or rail transit vehicles as part of two-person crew

B. Observe signals at crossings and arrival and departure points

C. Operate controls to open and close transit vehicle doors

D. Report delays, malfunctions and accidents to control unit

E. Direct passengers during emergency evacuation procedures.

F. Drive buses or streetcars to transport passengers along established routes to local destinations

G. Drive buses to transport passengers and goods to intercity or long distance destinations

H. Drive sightseeing tour buses to transport passengers locally or over long distances, and may provide information on points of interest during trip

I. Drive buses equipped for wheelchair accessibility, and aid passengers in boarding

J. Provide passengers with information on fares, schedules and stops

K. Collect fares, issue transfers, check bus passes and record transactions

L. Report delays, mechanical problems and accidents

M. May load and unload passengers' luggage.

Where they find work?

1. Transportation and warehousing - 85.0%
2. Educational services - 8.0%
3. Public administration - 2.0%
4. Retail trade - 1.0%
5. Health care and social assistance - 1.0%

What education do I need?

1. In general, you usually need a high school diploma and must have a minimum of one year of safe-driving experience.

2. You usually receive three months' on-the-job training including classroom instruction.

3. To be a bus driver, you need a Class B, C, E or F driver's licence in Ontario and a Class 2 driver's licence elsewhere.

4. To be a subway or light rail transit operator, you usually need experience as a public transit bus driver.

5. You may need an Air Brakes Endorsement and First Aid Certificate.

6. With experience, you may move up the ranks to become a supervisor or an inspector.

High School Subject that will help:

1. English
2. Mechanics

What can you expect to make:

The average hourly wages for Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators is $16.18/HR, which is below average for occupations in the trades, transport and equipment operators sector and close to the average for all intermediate occupations. These wages grew at an average rate from 2002 to 2004.

Average Wage

Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators wages

Expected Wage by Age

Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators Wage By Age

Unemployment:

5% of Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators are unemployed. This rate is close to the average for intermediate occupations.

Unemployment

Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators Unemployment

Trends in Unemployment

Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators Trends in Unemployment

Current Job Outlook:

The job outlook for Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators is considered Average because:

1. Employment grew at an above-average rate.

2. Hourly wages ($16.18) are close to the average ($18.07), and the rate of wage growth is close to the average.

3. The unemployment rate (5%) is close to the 2004 average (7%).

Future Job Prospects:

Your job outlook will continue to be Average because:

1. The employment growth rate will likely be average because urban spread/traffic congestion should continue to force governments to expand public transportation. However, demand for school bus drivers will likely decrease because of fewer school-age children.

2. Although the retirement rate will likely be average, the number of retiring workers should contribute to job openings.

3. The number of job openings will likely exceed the number of job seekers. This will not be significant enough to have an impact on the work prospects.

Highest Concetration:

The highest concentrations (per 10,000 people) of are found in Alberta and Prince Edward Island while the lowest concentrations are in New Brunswick and Newfoundland.

Unionization Rate:

The unionization rate (59%) is close to the average (32%) for all occupations.

Useful Experience:

1. Dealing with the public

2. Mechanics

3. Safety procedures

Part Time Workers

Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators Part Time Workers

Part time workers:


36% of Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators are employed only on a part-time basis. There were 82,000 workers employed in these occupations in 2004, an increase of 29% since 1997.

Age Demographics

Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators Age Demographics

Age Demographics:


The relatively low percentage of younger workers suggests few entry-level job openings, and could point to a greater need for workers with experience or a number of years of training. The older-than-average worker (43) will likely be offset by a later retirement age (64) resulting in an average retirement rate to 2009.

Self Employed

Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators Self Employed

Self Employed:


Roughly 3% of Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators are self-employed. This is considered Average for the industry as a whole.

Men vs Women

Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators Men vs Women

Men vs Women:


39% of the individuals employed as Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators are women. Compared to other industries, this is Average.