Bookmark and Share Scholarships

Recording, Scheduling and Distributing Occupations

What they do?

Shippers and receivers ship and receive goods, maintain records, and oversee loading/unloading of goods.

A. Storekeepers and parts clerks store and issue parts/supplies both for sale and use in their organizations.

B. Production clerks prepare work schedules, and co-ordinate/monitor movement of materials and the production process.

C. Purchasing clerks buy materials for organizations.

D. Inventory clerks maintain computerized or manual records of materials.

E. Dispatchers operate radio/telecommunications equipment to dispatch vehicles, drivers, and personnel.

F. Radio operators communicate with personnel on ships, aircraft, offshore oil rigs, and other remote locations. They also operate Canadian Forces communications equipment.

Where they find work?

1. Wholesale trade - 41.0%
2. Retail trade - 18.0%
3. Transportation and warehousing - 12.0%
4. Public administration - 5.0%
5. Administrative and support waste management and remediation services - 3.0%
6. Fabricated metal product manufacturing - 3.0%
7. Food manufacturing - 3.0%

What education do I need?

1. You usually need a high school diploma and may need some specialized training after high school, along with some work experience.

2. To be a shipper or receiver, you may need a driver's licence and forklift certificate.

3. To be a parts clerk, you may need a three-year apprenticeship program or specialized high school training and a one-year college course. Trade certification is available but voluntary in all provinces, except in Ontario. British Columbia offers a three-year apprenticeship program and voluntary certification for industrial engines/equipment partsperson. Red Seal, an interprovincial trade certification, is also available to qualified parts clerks.

4. To be an inventory clerk, you may need courses in production/inventory management and must be able to operate computerized inventory systems.

5. To be a police or emergency dispatcher, you usually need on-the-job training. To operate radios, you usually require a provincial radio operator's certificate.

6. With experience, you may move up the ranks to become a supervisor.

High School Subject that will help:

1. Math
2. Computer Basics - Word and Excel
3. English
4. Business

What can you expect to make:

The average hourly wages for Recording, Scheduling and Distributing Occupations is $14.96/HR, which is close to the average for occupations in the business, finance and administration sector and are close to the average for all intermediate occupations. These wages grew at an average rate from 2002 to 2004.

Average Wage

Recording, Scheduling and Distributing Occupations wages

Expected Wage by Age

Recording, Scheduling and Distributing Occupations Wage By Age

Unemployment:

6% of Recording, Scheduling and Distributing Occupations are unemployed. This rate is close to the average for intermediate occupations.

Unemployment

Recording, Scheduling and Distributing Occupations Unemployment

Trends in Unemployment

Recording, Scheduling and Distributing Occupations Trends in Unemployment

Current Job Outlook:

The job outlook for Recording, Scheduling and Distributing Occupations is considered Below Average because:

1. Employment grew at an average rate.

2. Hourly wages ($14.96) are close to the average ($18.07), and the rate of wage growth is close to the average.

3. The unemployment rate (6%) is close to the 2004 average (7%).

Future Job Prospects:

Your job outlook will continue to be Below Average because:

1. The employment growth rate will likely be close to the average.

2. The retirement rate will likely be below average, and the number of retiring workers should not contribute significantly to job openings.

3. The number of job seekers will likely match the number of job openings.

Highest Concetration:

The highest concentrations (per 10,000 people) of Recording, Scheduling and Distributing Occupations are found in Quebec and Ontario while the lowest concentrations are in Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland.

Unionization Rate:

The unionization rate (29%) is close to the average (32%) for all occupations.

Useful Experience:

1. Communication skills

2. Record-keeping/inventory

3. Supervisory experience

Part Time Workers

Recording, Scheduling and Distributing Occupations Part Time Workers

Part time workers:


8% of Recording, Scheduling and Distributing Occupations are employed only on a part-time basis. There were 260,000 workers employed in these occupations in 2004, an increase of 26% since 1997.

Age Demographics

Recording, Scheduling and Distributing Occupations Age Demographics

Age Demographics:


The younger-than-average age (38) of worker will likely result in a below-average retirement rate to 2009.

Self Employed

Recording, Scheduling and Distributing Occupations Self Employed

Self Employed:


Roughly 1% of Recording, Scheduling and Distributing Occupations are self-employed. This is considered Below average for the industry as a whole.

Men vs Women

Recording, Scheduling and Distributing Occupations Men vs Women

Men vs Women:


31% of the individuals employed as Recording, Scheduling and Distributing Occupations are women. Compared to other industries, this is Average.